SENTIMENTAL DETAILS

Brass letterbox in Dublin, Ireland

THE DEVIL IN THE DOORS DETAIL

The details are not the details.
They make the
design.

Charles Eames ~Architect&Furniture Designer

WHAT WILL BE REMEMBERED?

Recently I had to move out of a place where I spent a good few years of my life. The time has come and the change was needed. Time to make a space for something new. Humans will get used to anything. We often find comfort in strange places and situations. Adaptation is the survival skill. The rescue and the trap.

What makes a place? What’s remembered?
Smell, texture, light, sometimes sounds. The small details.

The Edwardian house I had to move out from in Dublin had some hidden characteristics, original, historical details. Brass door handle, letterbox frame, door press that has not been working for a hundred years! The front door resembles an old tree where history reveals itself.

 

I was experimenting with angles in my short photo documentary. While writing this post I am experimenting with the WordPress new plugin called Gutenberg.

Review of the Gutenberg plugin; working with images is fun while creating columns and different layouts. Working with text is less fun. Every time the return key is pressed the plugin creates a new text box. Confusing when it comes to creating spaces between text and image boxes. Hard to generate clear spaces.

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Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

CHAPELIZOD ILLUSTRATIONS

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland

TOUR OF THE VILLAGE

Chapelizod is one of many places described by James Joyce in his book Ulysses. After reading chosen fragments referring to the place I designed a series of images following the same creative style and technique. Each image carries a vibrant colour against the monochromatic background. I wanted to create an abstract, dream-like feel to the series.

I do not know much about the village other than it is a rather old place located just beside The Phoenix Park in Dublin. You get the feeling once it was a pleasant place to live in where all the neighbours knew each other. Today, it is a place with no personality, no life or character. Used only as a passing place to other destinations.

Picking up on that mood I have chosen the most significant landmarks. Places that once had something to offer. At present they seem outdated, forgotten and isolated.

 

LEMON GREEN

Ireland sober is Ireland stiff – James Joyce

Eircom phone box, once upon a time offered the use of modern technology and communication. At present covered in a spider web, contrasting with an old building wrapped in ivy.

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photograph traced in Illustrator
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photo manipulation.

ORANGE

A nation is the same people living in the same place – James Joyce

Will this boat be ever used again? … Probably not. Because what would it be used for? Fishing? Recreation? The owner may have left the village and has forgotten all about it. You can sens the physical presence of a person. The no more existing owner of the boat.

Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

 

TURQUOISE

No pen, no ink, no table, no room, no time, no quiet, no inclination – James Joyce

 

Not a living soul. The town is empty. Walls of those buildings are as fragile as an eggshell. Unrealistic birds flying through the town. On their way to a warmer more hopeful places.

Wake up now!

Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

 

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

VICTORIAN FRONT GARDENS

Victorian front garden

VICTORIAN CLUES

To complete the journey on the Victorian architecture, here are some photographs that were taken in May 2018. Victorian gardens and houses in the Rathgar area.

In Ireland watering the gardens or the grass is totally unnecessary, in fact, I do not think I have ever have seen anyone doing so. Because of the humidity in the air everything around is full of life and greenery.

    

During the Industrial Revolution, there was a rapid development of the Dublin city, which at that time was under the British rule. I am not a great fan of the city centre, but I do really like the neighbourhood in which I live. It has a lot of character. When walking around it I have an impression I travelled back in time to the British colonial period. Something Irish people would not see as intriguing or entertaining as I do, at all. I only want to admire the aesthetics of that period.

Solid front doors with ornaments made of brass. Sparkle cleaned every Saturday, by very well-educated housewives. Perfectly matched colours of the doors with the facade of the buildings or with the plants in the garden. Romanticism hidden in organic vault lines over the front doors. Refined British black gates, fences and barriers. Perfect set for a romance during an Art Nouveau period.

 

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

RATHGAR HOUSE DOCUMENTARY

Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland

VICTORIAN HOUSE IN DUBLIN

Rathgar is a village in the south of Dublin with its origins going back to 1862. As far as I know, the south of Dublin and the Victorian houses were lived by the Protestants rather than Catholics. Therefor wealthier families have always lived here. This house is about hundred and fifty years old, within a very close proximity to the house where James Joyce was born. It is a nice neighbourhood, safe, quiet, very green with plenty of gorgeous gardens.

 

This was the first project with a manual camera I had to do and the aim of it was to experiment with angles, focus, lighting, and still life. I wanted to document it in a style of 1940s. At least the way I think it was back then, with the slow pace of life. When people had the time and will to talk and to get to know each other. When they did not have to do hundreds of things in a one day. When they did not have to be perfect, trendy, successful, rich and famous. But they were ambitious, hard-working, well mannered and authentic.

There is a poem I studied in my primary school and for some reason, the mood in this documentary reminds me of it.

Czeslaw Milosz
A song about the end of the world

(…) And those who were waiting 
for thunder and lightning
Are disappointed.
And those who were expecting
signs and archangels’ trumpets
Do not believe it is happening now.
As long as the sun and the moon are above,
As long as the bumblebee visits the rose,
As long as children are born rosy,
Nobody believes it is happening now.

And only an old man with grey hair who would be a prophet
But he is not a prophet because he has another thing to do,
He says while tying tomatoes:
There will not be another end of the world,
There will not be another end of the world.

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The end of the world has come to that house too.  It has been repossessed by Permanent TSB Bank and soon will be put on sale. All tenants have to be out. The banks have no mercy. For some, it is The End of The World.

Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland
Rathgar House, Dublin, Ireland

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra

TANGO, MILONGA IN DUBLIN 2011

Tango-milonga, Dublin 2011

MILONGA EVENING

The third time I went with my camera for the milonga evening I was feeling well experienced and prepared.

Milonga dance incorporates the same basic elements as Tango but permits a greater relaxation of legs and body. Movement is normally faster, and pauses are less common. It is usually a kind of rhythmic walking without complicated figures, with a more humorous and rustic style in contrast with the serious and dramatic Tango. (source: here)

I had to check myself what a milonga is …

 

Tango evenings in Dublin were always more of social events for me. Great way to network. The Third Place as they call it in marketing. The kind of a place where one meets people who are not connected to the work, family or personal past. Conversations are universal, thought to require good social skills and some general knowledge to share with others while conversing. Unless one wants to talk about tango … but there is no point of bringing wood into the forest.

There happened a good few marriages in the group, few children were born and some painful break-ups too. Some left Ireland for good, some stayed loyal to the dance for years and years. People come and go. The endorphins keep bringing people together.

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I am very happy with this shoot. A couple of tango dancers are standing still, concentrating. Silence before the storm. It is so relaxing. Every time I look at it, I am Zen.

Tango-milonga, Dublin 2011
Tango-milonga, Dublin 2011

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

TANGO PRACTICE, DUBLIN 2011

Dublin tango workshop, 2011

TANGO WORKSHOP

After the film broke apart in my Zenit camera, bravely I tried again a week later. This time with a different equipment but the same film Ilford Delta 400. One of the tango dancers, who was more experience than me with manual cameras, was very kind and helped me to change the film. That evening I must have used two rolls of film.

   

When I was reducing the size of images in Photoshop for this post I started getting very sentimental … in general. It must be the effect of the black and white photographs with all the noise in them, like a vinyl record with slightly huskily sound. The passing of time. Special moments appreciated more as they are gone. Life.

“All those moments
will be lost in time,
like tears in rain.
Time to die.”

Tears in rain, Blade Runner

 

MUSIC IN THE SOUL

Girls dancing with the girls! Boys dancing with the boys! Laughters, whispers, spontaneity. Joy!

 

FACES, PEOPLE, COUPLES, FRIENDS

Love affairs, broken hearts, bonding, flirtation, jealousy. Passion.

 

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Step by step. Patience, perseverance, hard work. Relax.

 

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra