WRZEŚNIA ON AN OLD PHOTOGRAPHY

Ulica Sienkiewicza we Wrześni przed wojną

WRZEŚNIA MY WRZEŚNIA

I am born in and raised in Września but I have spent half of my life abroad. Returning to Poland after twenty years allowed me to look at my town from the perspective of … a visitor. Familiarity breeds contempt, they say. It is hard to appreciate what around us. Before I have left Poland I did not think much of the town I come from. Therefore, it is good and healthy to take a break from time to time to gain a different attitude.

Września has revived. Walking through the streets of the town in the evening, I am under an impression I have travelled back in time. The architecture of tenement houses in the old part of the town and the attention put into details creates a very special atmosphere. Bicycle parking and street lamps are kept in the Art Nouveau style, the period of the town greatest prosperity. Looking at the windows when the lights on, I can easily imagine the people living in them also come from the beginning of the century. The smallest details have been skillfully taken care of while refreshing the face of the town.

Września is located in Greater Poland, 50 km from Poznań, at an important road and rail point connecting Poznań with Warsaw. The location of the town has always been beneficial to the development of trade and crafts.

During the Second Partition of Poland, the town found itself in the East Prussia, therefore there is a strong influence of the Prussian presence in the town’s architecture. Those are very solid buildings with strong construction.

Every day at noon, the patriotic song Rota written by Maria Konopnicka is played through the town’s loudspeakers, in memory of the strike of the Września children in 1901. The children were the first to oppose speak in German during religion classes. The teacher punished them with a flog. Students of other schools in the Prussian partition followed in the footsteps of brave children from Września.

Three nations lived here at the beginning of the century; Germans, Jews and Poles who were the majority. It housed Roman Catholic churches, an Evangelical church, and a synagogue that was blown up by the Germans.

After the war, during the communist era, Września continued to develop, both economically and culturally. The loudspeaker factory was established here, in the 1980s every Polish music lover wanted to have one of them. Today, the main economic driver is the factory of Volkswagen AG, which employs 3,000 people. And once again Września is strongly influenced by its western neighbours.

The history of Września is much deeper, but in this series, I want to tell how much it has changed and transformed over time. From the pre-war period to the present day. The face of the town changes the same way as the face of a person depending on the conditions and the time it lives in …

WRZEŚNIA ON AN OLD PHOTOGRAPHY

The source of photography are the following books:
Ziemia i Powiat Wrzesiński na starej pocztówce, Jolanta Śliwczyńska, Waldemar Śliwczyński, Wydawnictwo Kropka, Września 2003

Przedwojenna Września Fotografie Franciszka Włosika, Wydawnictwo Kropka, Września 2005

Poznańska Street - view from St. Stanisław in Września, 1914
Poznańska Street – view from St. Stanisław in Września, 1914
Sąd przy ulicy Poznańskiej
Court at Poznańska Street
Ratusz miejski we Wrześni
Town Hall in Września
The Parish Church on Poznańska Street in 1038-1939
The Parish Church on Poznańska Street in 1038-1939
The market square in Września before the war
The market square in Września before the war
The exit of Poznańska Street to the Market Square in Września
The exit of Poznańska Street to the Market Square in Września
Września Poznańska Street
Września Poznańska Street
Mickiewicza Street in Września with a view of the Parish Church
Mickiewicza Street in Września with a view of the Parish Church
Września delicatessen shop before the war on the corner of Sienkiewicza Street and Rynek
Września delicatessen shop before the war on the corner of Sienkiewicza Street and Rynek
Tobolski's restaurant Kościelna Street in Września, 1915
Tobolski’s restaurant Kościelna Street in Września, 1915
Taxi and horse cabs at Zamkowa Street in Września
Taxi and horse cabs at Zamkowa Street in Września
Zamkowa Street in Września, 1909
Zamkowa Street in Września, 1909
Września ul. Dzieci Wrzesińskich in the early 1950s.
Września ul. Dzieci Wrzesińskich in the early 1950s.
Willa Mycielski on Kościuszki Street
Willa Mycielski on Kościuszki Street
The synagogue on Fabryczna Street in Września
The synagogue on Fabryczna Street in Września was built in 1875. During World War II, the synagogue was closed and turned into a temporary prison. The Nazis planned to convert the synagogue into a cinema and theatre, but eventually, they blew up the building in the fall of 1940. An air-raid shelter was built on the site of the synagogue and a square was arranged.
German plans to convert a synagogue into a cinema and theatre
Water supply tower
Water supply tower put into operation around 1910 Photo. W. Schenke, 1917

Autor: Aleksandra Walkowska

 

POP UP SHOP

Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival

POP UP SHOP FOR MONTREAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

Montreal Jazz Festival

Inspiration

The concept for the pop-up shop is a combination of two elements; wood the Canadians natural resource and jazz music. The construction of the container is solid and classic. Walls are covered in a black colour, spiced with an orange in reference to vivid notes in jazz. The display units are inspired by the shape of music coming out of a saxophone or a grand piano.

The Montreal Jazz Festival takes place every year in July and it is the largest jazz festival in the world. Every year it brings in around 3000 artists from 30 countries. The festival hosts in around 2 million people every year.

If it ever came to a construction of this pop-up shop converted from a freight train container I imagine it in a dense greenery, park or in the forest. Often, the deep, dense of greenery is so dark it appears black. Therefore, the colours of the pop-up shop would balance very well in nature, creating a coherent unity.

Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz FestivalPop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival
Pop up shop for Montreal Jazz Festival

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra

SUMMER WINDOW PROPOSAL FOR DESIGUAL

Desigual summer window proposal – day view

This is only a proposal without any budget limitation. The concept was to design a summer window for a fashion brand that took part in New York Fashion Week 2016.

Desigual is a casual clothing brand based in Barcelona, Spain. Founded by a Swiss man Thomas Meyer in 1984. Desigual in Spanish means uneven/unequal and the concept is applied in the brand design, through the use of asymmetry, patchworks, prints, graffiti art, and splashes of intense colour.

Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona
Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona (ft. Sparky)
Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona
Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona (ft. Sparky)
Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona
Desigual at Placa Catalunya in Barcelona (ft. Sparky)

CONCEPT

The project involved the design of two window display for the summer season. One for a large window at the front of the store with a dividing panel in the middle and a small window which in real life, would be somewhere off the main foot traffic. Both windows had to follow the same theme. I called the theme Summer in the City. Summer in a very hot climate can be hard to bear, without much greenery and water to cool down the end of the day is a blessing.

INSPIRATION

My large window is based on an idea of a play. A bunch of friends feel comfortable with each other jumping across cascading water. The heat is making them crazy, they feel free and they need to cool down, la vida es loca (life is crazy) as Desigual motto says.

Desigual window proposal with cascading water
Desigual window proposal with cascading water
Desigual summer window proposal – day view
Desigual summer window proposal – day view
Desigual night view
Desigual night view
Desigual night view
Desigual night view

 

The smaller window is inspired by a city seen as a concrete jungle. A couple of friends are hanging out in the skatepark preserving their energy chilling out.

Skate park window proposal for Desigual
Skatepark window proposal for Desigual

 

Perhaps at the back of my mind, I was designing the windows for Barcelona city where the hit can be as high as 40 degrees. Probably in other cooler places the concept would come across more like people having fun rather than an escape from the heat. At least I would hope so 🙂

 

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra

Post created in collaboration with Sparky Magazine.

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EASTER WINDOW DISPLAYS IN DUBLIN

Joanne Hynes window in Dunnes Stores

NOT MUCH EASTER IN THE WINDOW DISPLAYS,
DUBLIN 2017

Early morning on Sunday is the best time to take photographs of the window displays, the town is still sleeping and the streets are empty. The only problem is the reflection of buildings, buses, cars, and myself! But this time I tried to turn it into an advantage and show a bit of Dublin architecture at the same time. Like kids who are looking for chocolate eggs hidden in a garden, I went searching for an Easter window display!

For some time, I wasn’t paying much attention at all to the windows of Dunnes Stores in St. Stephen Green Shopping Center … simply because I did not think they were that great. But I was nicely surprised during my walk, last Sunday. Their style very much resembles displays on George Street, in my opinion, one of the best in town. Always.

Saint Stephen Green Shopping Center in Dublin
Saint Stephen Green Shopping Center in Dublin
Dunnes Stores in Saint Stephen Green Shopping Center in Dublin
Dunnes Stores in Saint Stephen Green Shopping Center in Dublin
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Willow in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center

JOANNE HYNES DISPLAY IN DUNNES STORES

Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Joanne Hynes in Dunnes Stores, St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Joanne Hynes window in Dunnes Stores on Grafton Street
Dunnes Stores in St Stephen Green Shopping Center
Joanne Hynes in Dunnes Stores on Grafton Street
Dunnes Stores on Grafton Street
Joanne Hynes in Dunnes Stores on Grafton Street

There is a very strong presence of Joanne Hynes funky style in most of Dunnes Stores windows, the displays are very colourful with a story behind it (what I like the most). A young girl went out shopping, she got inflatable jungle toys in her trolley. The colours and the patterns of a jungle must have been an inspiration for Joanne Hynes collection. It is a bright, tropical and a very playful display.

DESIGNERS WINDOWS IN DUNNES STORES ON GEORGE STREET

Paul Costelloe window in Dunnes Stores on George Street, Dublin
Carolyn Donelly window in Dunnes Stores on George Street, Dublin
Carolyn Donnelly window in Dunnes Stores on George Street, Dublin
Considered window display in Dunnes Stores on George Street, Dublin
Considered window display in Dunnes Stores on George Street, Dublin

BROWN THOMAS

Not much Easter in Brown Thomas windows this year, rather than eating chocolate eggs and bunnies the store is encouraging the potential buyers to get fit, sign up for yoga classes, go for a run or join the gym. I quite like the construction behind the mannequins, it reminds me of a graphic symbol that stands for an option on a treadmill – called Fat Burn! Ha, very clever idea 🙂

Lulu Lemon in Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Lulu Lemon in Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Lulu Lemon in Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Lulu Lemon in Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Brown Thomas window display on Grafton Street, Dublin

CHANEL

Chanel window display in Brown Thomas, Grafton Street
Chanel window display in Brown Thomas

I don’t really get the hidden clue behind Chanel window display … It all looks very digital, electronic, colourful cables connected to the accessories … yet the mannequins style is very 1920s, 1930s. What’s the message? The technology is changing but Chanel style stays the same – is that it?

HERMÈS

Hermes window display in Brown Thomas, Grafton Street
Hermès window display in Brown Thomas, Grafton Stree

Hermès display refers to the classical Greek columns, here they could mean long tradition. The columns are very elastic. Is it a similar message as in Chanel windows? Hermès is classic and adaptable …? Perhaps.

LOUIS VUITTON

Louis Vuitton window display in Brown Thomas, Dublin
Louis Vuitton window display in Brown Thomas, Dublin
Louis Vuitton window display in Brown Thomas, Dublin
Louis Vuitton window display in Brown Thomas, Dublin

 

AROUND GRAFTON STREET

MASSIMO DUTTI

Massimo Dutti window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti menswear window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti woman window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti menswear window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti window display on Grafton Street, Dublin
Massimo Dutti woman window display on Grafton Street, Dublin

 

Design Atelier window display on Grafton St, Dublin
Design Atelier window display on Grafton St, Dublin
Design Atelier window display on Grafton St, Dublin
Design Atelier window display on Grafton St, Dublin

GRAHAMS SHOE STORE

Grahams shoes store window display for Easter 2017
Grahams Shoe Store window display for Easter 2017

Very few stores created Easter display in their windows, I find Graham Shoe display very cute with the little chicks and rabbits living among shoes and high hills, like if that was their natural environment. It put a smile on my face 🙂

BUTLERS CHOCOLATE CAFE

Butlers Chocolates Cafe window display in Dublin
Butlers Chocolates Cafe window display in Dublin

 

glass reflection in Dublin
Naturally created window display

 

     

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra

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DUBLIN WINDOWS SPRING 2017

Hermes silk scarf in Brown Thomas window

ANOTHER EARLY SUNDAY STROLL AND SHORT VISUAL REPORTAGE OF WINDOW DISPLAY IN SOUTH DUBLIN

The town is not very big, so I tend to stay in one area with the most attractive visual merchandising. Wish it was a bigger town I could take longer walks and admire the creative work.

My most favourite one is Dunnes Stores on George Street, the spring is there with the colours and texture, all looking very playful and fresh.

Always enjoy Massimo Dutti windows for the perfect composition. The negative space creates an impression the characters played by mannequins are bit dreamy and distanced, they are in the world of their own.

Brown Thomas windows look quite urban with the squared props and minimalistic use of the walls. The colours are selling in the spring season. Even though it is still rather cold outside!

Featured image – Hermès silk scarf in Brown Thomas window, Dublin

Author: Walkowska Aleksndra

THE FUTURE OF TRADITIONAL RETAIL

Bansky 'Trolley hunters'

Shopping is a modern version of hunting, why not turn it into a place of adventure and a positive challenge rather than a lonely planet …

By nature, we are hunter-gatherers we need to work together to fulfil each other’s roles in collecting the essentials to survive. Dopamine is responsible for the feeling we get when we find something we’re looking for or we [achieve] something we set out to accomplish, says Simon Sinek. The hormone is released every time we get closer to our goal. Our bodies feel satisfaction and keep us motivated, without the hormone we would become idle and waste away.

Traditional retail is in a crisis today and the ideas to improve the situation in the future looks sterile, lonely and isolated. If we are served by the robots we will become robots too.

Who will benefit from being looked after by a robot in a store, an app sending messages every time we pass a store or an idea of doing grocery shopping while sitting in a car seat?

The idea of Amazon Go shopping seems most efficient. It’s simple – in and out of a store – no queuing to pay for our shopping means we will have more spare time for ourselves at the end of the day. That’s a positive outcome.

Human contact is a very important part of the shopping experience as we all know it

It is the more personal conversation or a short witty chat with a person behind the counter I think rather than information provided about the product. My Iranian friend can talk to anyone standing beside him in the shop, perhaps it is a part of his culture to treat shopping as a social experience. As a regular customer at the fish counter in Dunnes Stores, I got a small discount which was offered to me by the stall owner – a robot or an app will never do that.

What do you think about the use of an advanced technology in retail in the nearest future? Do you like some of the new inventions?

What do you think about the use of an advanced technology in retail in the nearest future? Do you like the idea? 

Hunting in prehistoric art ‘Rock Art of the Tassili n’Ajjer

African market stall photographed by © Derek Speirs
African market stall photographed by © Derek Speirs
Temple Bar by Market in Dublin by © Greville Edwards
The market in Berlin by © Greville Edwards
Food market in Barcelona by © Greville Edwards
Food market in Barcelona by © Greville Edwards
Food market in Barcelona by Greville Edwards
Food market in Barcelona by © Greville Edwards
Market in Dublin by © Greville Edwards
The market in Dublin by © Greville Edwards
Temple Bar by Market in Dublin by © Greville Edwards
The market in Temple Bar, Dublin by © Greville Edwards

Author: Walkowska Aleksndra

Featured image – Bansky ‘Trolly Hunters’

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