TWITTER & AIRBNB HEADQUARTERS IN DUBLIN

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Dublin is the place where many world companies have their headquarters in Europe. Over the years I had a chance to visit a few of them either through The Open House Festival or through friends who invited me for a lunch. Friends Lunch Invitation is one of the benefits offered to the employees of those companies. Inside there is always very good interior design which follows the company branding and the philosophy of the business. Canteens and dining rooms are usually the most attractive. Not to mention the food which is absolutely de-li-cious, served with a lot of love and care.

TWITTER

In Twitter dominates wooden texture, black, blue and white colour. I was wondering why the wood is an important element of the interior design? I think I found the answer – birds twit while resting on the trees! That must be the connection to the wood.

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland
Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Twitter Headquarter in Dublin, IrelandWooden floor in the dining room

I was lucky to visit Airbnb through The Open House Festival and get a little tour of the place. Airbnb brings the idea of travelling also into their working space. Every day a team of employees will choose to work in a different area and at a different desk. Therefore one does not get attached to their own working space. Keep on moving! Keep on travelling! That’s the idea behind it. There is always a space provided for small personal belongings, but it is kept minimalistic. The main meeting place is built like an old Greek amphitheatre where the sound travels perfectly and the screen presentation is visible to everybody.

The location of Airbnb in Dublin is an attractive one too. Located at The Grand Canal Dock just beside The Marker Hotel and many different coffee shops, pubs and restaurants. It is a spot where the cold Irish Sea meets the apartment blocks providing an interesting space to relax.

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland
Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

Airbnb Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland

The Grand Canal Dock, Dublin, Ireland

 

More on a few Dublin’s headquarters in my next post.

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

SENTIMENTAL DETAILS

Brass letterbox in Dublin, Ireland

THE DEVIL IN THE DOORS DETAIL

The details are not the details. They make the design.

Charles Eames~Architect&Furniture Designer

WHAT WILL BE REMEMBERED?

Recently I had to move out of a place where I spent a good few years of my life. The time has come and the change was needed. Time to make space for something new. Humans will get used to anything. We often find comfort in strange places and situations. Adaptation is the survival skill. The rescue and the trap.

What makes a place? What’s remembered? Smell, air, texture, light, sometimes sounds. The small details. The Edwardian house I had to move out from in Dublin had some hidden characteristics, original, historical details. Brass door handle, letterbox frame, door press that has not been working for a hundred years! The front door resembles an old tree where history reveals itself. Here it is a symbol of transformation. Passing from one place to another. From familiar to unknown. Physical and mental transformation. I was experimenting with angles in my short photo documentary. The stains on the brass door resemble blood and sweat dripping from a human body after hard work. The Victorian door knocker looks like a crucifix …

Is it just me seeing it?

 


 

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Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

CHAPELIZOD ILLUSTRATIONS

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland

TOUR OF THE VILLAGE

Chapelizod is one of many places described by James Joyce in his book Ulysses. After reading chosen fragments referring to the place I designed a series of images following the same creative style and technique. Each image carries a vibrant colour against the monochromatic background. I wanted to create an abstract, dream-like feel to the series.

I do not know much about the village other than it is a rather old place located just beside The Phoenix Park in Dublin. You get the feeling once it was a pleasant place to live in where all the neighbours knew each other. Today, it is a place with no personality, no life or character. Used only as a passing place to other destinations.

Picking up on that mood I have chosen the most significant landmarks. Places that once had something to offer. At present they seem outdated, forgotten and isolated.

LEMON GREEN

Ireland sober is Ireland stiff – James Joyce

Eircom phone box, once upon a time offered the use of modern technology and communication. At present covered in a spider web, contrasting with an old building wrapped in ivy.

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photograph traced in Illustrator
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photo manipulation.

ORANGE

A nation is the same people living in the same place – James Joyce

Will this boat be ever used again? … Probably not. Because what would it be used for? Fishing? Recreation? The owner may have left the village and has forgotten all about it. You can sens the physical presence of a person. The no more existing owner of the boat.

Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

TURQUOISE

No pen, no ink, no table, no room, no time, no quiet, no inclination – James Joyce

 

Not a living soul. The town is empty. Walls of those buildings are as fragile as an eggshell. Unrealistic birds flying through the town. On their way to a warmer more hopeful places.

Wake up now!

Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

BREAD PACKAGING

Olive bread packaging

THE BAKER ON NASSAU BREAD PACKAGING

The brief asked for a label design for an imaginary gourmet bread line, produced by The Baker on Nassau. Each bread has its own history, tradition and recipe.

I based my concept on the bread origin. Emphasising typefaces as a reference to a cultural aspect of the place. Each label tells a brief history of the product. The label wraps the bread in such a way the consumers could hold it without getting covered in a floor.

Gold Rush bread label typeface refers to 1920s in America and the yellow colour is a reference to sun heat, gold and corn.

Leningrad bread label typeface refers to Lenin and the red colour is a reference to Communist Russia.

Dubh bread label typeface refers to Celtic Ireland and the green colour is a colour of Ireland, the Green Emerald.

Olive Branch bread label typeface refers to the traditional Greek alphabet. The blue colour is a colour of sunny Greece, the popular holiday’s destination.

PRESENTATION OF THE BREAD LABELS

bread packaging
Gold Rush&Leningrad bread packaging
bread packaging
Dubh&Olive Branch bread packaging

DUBH – IRISH BREAD PACKAGING

 

Dubh bread packaging

Dubh bread packaging
Dubh bread packaging

GOLD RUSH – AMERICAN BREAD PACKAGING

 

Gold Rush bread packaging

Gold Rush bread packaging
Gold Rush bread packaging

LENINGRAD – RUSSIAN BREAD PACKAGING

Leningrad bread packaging

Leningrad bread packaging
Leningrad bread packaging

BLACK OLIVE – GREEK BREAD PACKAGING

 

Olive bread packaging
Olive bread packaging

LABELS DETAILS

Gold Rush bread packaging
Gold Rush bread packaging
Leningrad bread packaging
Leningrad bread packaging
Olive bread packaging
Olive bread packaging
Dubh bread packaging
Dubh bread packaging

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

VICTORIAN PACKAGING

Victorian tea and coffee packaging

VICTORIAN STYLE PACKAGING

This is a mock project for the tea and coffee packaging. The aim of it was to design 3D product following the styling of the set and then a photo shoot.

The Thompson Tea and Coffee Company based in Britain has been importing their products from Kenya for almost 150 years, so it would mean they started their trade journey during The Victorian Era. This was my starting point of the concept development.

 

Looking back now, I think I must have been inspired by the book I read as a child called In Desert and Wilderness wrote by Henryk Sienkiewicz. It tells a story of two kids travelling through Africa. The description of nature in the book is so superbly written that as a child I was able to imagine and feel the dust, the humidity, the burning sun heat, the smell of camels, leather, tea and yes coffee too if such was present.

I wanted to create a scenery of a picnic after a very long journey, somewhere in the middle of the desert beside rocks. The crew is sitting by the fire, preparing for the night. Dust, sand and scorpions are the company of the set.

For the typography I followed a tutorial on vintage signing, the link is here. My tea packaging was meant to be more green but the printer we had in the college caused some problems. I borrowed some old books and the scarves, bought the vintage cup at the antique shop and some old photographs with handwritten envelop at the flea market. I remember I paid €5 for the lot after negotiation! I guess I paid for the fact that I did NOT have it more than anything else!

After printing and folding the boxes we were ready for the styling and photoshoot. The final product is an ad campaign for Fallon&Byrne which here in Ireland is an exotic products store and a restaurant.

 

Victorian tea and coffee packaging
Victorian tea and coffee packaging
Victorian tea and coffee packaging
Victorian tea and coffee packaging

 

SIGNAGE&TYPOGRAPHY

PACKAGING CUT OUTS

 

Kericho tea packaging

 

Kericho coffee packaging

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska

VICTORIAN FRONT GARDENS

Victorian front garden

VICTORIAN CLUES

To complete the journey on the Victorian architecture, here are some photographs that were taken in May 2018. Victorian gardens and houses in the Rathgar area.

In Ireland watering the gardens or the grass is totally unnecessary, in fact, I do not think I have ever have seen anyone doing so. Because of the humidity in the air everything around is full of life and greenery.

    

During the Industrial Revolution, there was a rapid development of the Dublin city, which at that time was under the British rule. I am not a great fan of the city centre, but I do really like the neighbourhood in which I live. It has a lot of character. When walking around it I have an impression I travelled back in time to the British colonial period. Something Irish people would not see as intriguing or entertaining as I do, at all. I only want to admire the aesthetics of that period.

Solid front doors with ornaments made of brass. Sparkle cleaned every Saturday, by very well-educated housewives. Perfectly matched colours of the doors with the facade of the buildings or with the plants in the garden. Romanticism hidden in organic vault lines over the front doors. Refined British black gates, fences and barriers. Perfect set for a romance during an Art Nouveau period.

 

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Author: Aleksandra Walkowska