1990’s THE WILD WEST IN POLAND

Solidarity movement poster with John Wayne as a cowboy

WILD WEST IN THE WILD EAST

The Round Table Agreement happened on the 5th of April in 1989. Today it is considered to be the last day of Communism in Poland, just in theory though as we found out many, many years later. Bunch of guys met at a round table, made some agreements, few deals and they called it the end of the evil era. Four hundred and fifty-two politicians were sitting around that table. The shape of it represented the wholeness, eternity and timelessness.

politicians meeting at the round table
The Round Table Agreement 1989, Warsaw, Poland

What goes around, goes around, goes around
Comes all the way back around …
(Justin Timberlake)

POST COMMUNIST ERA

Like after any other revolution, people here also naively believed in change for the better of course. Lech Wałęsa was selling the slogan of Poland becoming second Japan (at the time the fastest-growing economy). As you rightly guessed, that has not happened, yet. Despite the hope and ambition for wealth and prosperity, it was the very opposite for the common Polish citizens. The situation very much resembled the story in a great novel written by George Orwell ‘Animal farm’. Unemployment was growing, factories were closing down, Polish companies were sold to foreign investors. A month would not pass without street protests all over the country. People were looking back with nostalgia at the Communism times, saying; life was much better back than … at least it seemed like that for the most. Everyday life was slowly becoming more and more miserable.

Farmers_strike_Poland_1990
Farmers strike, Poland, 1990s

Not a single living ray
could break through the flood of clouds
chased by winds.
‘Ravens and crows will peck us’ by Stefan Żeromski

By 1991 the Soviet troops left Poland for good. At the same time, petty traders from the east came to Polish towns and filled the street markets with goods straight from the cold east. They were selling everything from; gold to kitchen tools, watches, furs, toys, even live bears … the diversity of the merchandising stock was endless. The eastern goods were transported in huge personal suitcases rather than international cargo containers.

Soviet_peaked_hat

Colour TV was becoming very popular at the time. Since there was no access to the firm electronic brands, most of the Polish homes had a Russian brand called Rubin – those TV’s tended to go on fire when heated up! Their popularity quickly was replaced with something of better quality.

People would believe in anything at the time. One of the most successful and quirky programs was a live session with a Russian healer Anatolij Kaszpirowski. The man had the power to heal people through the TV screen. Apparently. His slow, wearisome, tedious voice put most of the people asleep, especially the elderly once. He had the power to do that for sure! One, two, three and the viewer is snoring …

Anatolij_Kaszpirowski
Anatolij Kaszpirowski

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

Italian cheap car brand Fiat quickly appeared on the market. The great exodus of the young Polish entrepreneurs hungry for the better, bigger engines took off to the West of Europe.

Italian_car_fiat_1990One thing that brings back positive recollections is the Jarocin summer music festival. The most uncommercial musical event of the times. The town is not far from where I come from.  Back then no one was selling today’s popular festival gadgets: ‘Been there, done that’ got the t-shirt.

The 90’s in Poland was the beginning of let’s call it capitalism but in a pretty wild version of it.

Polish_transport_invention_1990

All images are linked to the sources.

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

BRANDING IN POLAND 1980’s

WHAT WAS THE BRANDING LIKE?

Probably the greatest advertisement and pride of Poland in the 1980s was Zbigniew Boniek, the legend of Polish football, fast, red hair, humble man, striker of goals. At that time the concept of celebrity did not exist. Boniek on several occasions would admit that he did not feel comfortable in the inflated world of luxury.

Zbigniew-Boniek-football-1982
Zbigniew Boniek, 1982
Zbigniew Boniek
Zbigniew Boniek, recently

A world-class player is going to play a year or two and is set for the rest of his life. These exorbitant earnings are stupid. If all footballers earned 50 per cent less, they would play football the same way. Neither worse nor better.

***

An advertisement is said to be a leverage of trade, but back then there were no commercials neither was there anything to trade with. The packaging and the branding of products did not make them very appealing. It made one think that not much of an effort was put into the promotion of the products. Nevertheless, a very small amount of plastic used for packaging allowed for quicker disposal of garbage back then. Unlike today when recycling takes up quite a bit of a conscious effort.

***

POLISH SWEETS

Polish sweets were delicious, there were no preservatives that can be traced in sweets today. In 1995, the Prince Polo package was changed, the bar was no longer wrapped in paper, but in plastic.

Chocolate bar Prince Polo
Chocolate bar Prince Polo 1980’s
Rebranded Prince Polo packaging
Rebranded Prince Polo packaging

WEDEL

The origins of the Wedel sweets factory dates back to 1851. In the tasteful interiors of the confectionery at Miodowa Street in Warsaw, Karol Wedel served his customers with drinking chocolate.

Wedel chocolate packaging 1980s
Wedel chocolate packaging 1980s
Wedel bitter chocolate packaging
Wedel bitter chocolate packaging

ŻYWIEC POLISH BEER

In between 1981-1990, there were 80 breweries in Poland, today there are over 300 breweries. The Polish brewing market is one of the fastest-growing branches of the economy. The technology of beer production is one of the highest in the world. Żywiec is a town in the south of Poland where Żywiec Brewery Museum can be found which tells the story of one of the most popular beers in Poland.

Żywiec beer 1945-1989
Żywiec bottled beer branding 1945-1989
Beer mat 1945-1989
Beer mat 1945-1989
Żywiec labelling before rebranding
Żywiec labelling before rebranding
Moderated Żywiec branding, 2010
Moderated Żywiec branding, 2010

The new can is the only one in Europe equipped with a thermo-active indicator reacting to temperature change. When the symbol of the Habsburg crown visible on the packaging turns blue it is a sign that Żywiec is perfectly chilled. The same indicator appears on the bottle.

POLISH BANKNOTES

The Polish currency also underwent rebranding after the overthrow of communism. Polish banknotes and passports have been designed by Andrzej Heidrich for the last 50 years. In the years 1970-1988 the fifty-zloty banknote captured an image of Karol Świerczewski a communist, serving the Red Army, who was falsely named a hero.

50 złoty banknote from 1980's
50 złoty banknote from the 1980s

After denomination in 1995, Polish banknotes were replaced with banknotes of Polish Kings. Today the fifty-zloty note features Kazimierz The Great, the last ruler of the Piast dynasty on the Polish throne. A thoughtful and ambitious ruler who introduced many reforms in the country. There is a saying that Kazimierz The Great; found Poland built out of wood but left it behind built off stones. The inspiration for the image is an engraving of Jan Matejko.

50 złoty banknote from the 2019
50 złoty banknote from 2019

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

POLISH PLAYTHINGS IN 1970s

WHAT HAPPENED IN THE 1970s?

What’s the most significant thing that happened in my life in Poland in the 1970s? … My brother was born. I remember well walking towards the house through the meadow with my father to welcome my newly arrived brother. This is the very first image I have in my collection of memories. People say I shouldn’t remember it as I was too little.

Why shouldn’t I?

Wooden clock from the 1970s

WHAT WAS POLAND LIKE IN THOSE DAYS?

It was the early days of the Solidarity movements, with protests and shootings in Gdańsk and Katowice in the north, and much the same in the south of Poland. My parents could only get reports and information from Radio Free Europe broadcasting from America, no mainstream news would ever talk about it. Full control from The Soviet Union was on. And then the Pope of the time visited and gave the Polish people courage and support, then the revolution started and the attempted assassination of the Pope came a couple of years later.

Radio Iza, 1975

Only recently I found out how terrified the whole Eastern Block was of this new Polish Pope. Apparently, Poland was full of spies. Jack Strong is a popular America movie that depicts those times very well and it has some great car chases.

WHAT WAS IT LIKE FOR ME IN POLAND THEN?

From the perspective of a little kid, it was my territory, where I could play and feel safe, well, in my grandparent’s yard in the countryside that is. Those images in my head are like postcards, photographs, short videos; an ocean of memories. Severe winters, ice painted patterns on the windows, my grandmother’s jewellery and a witch coming out of a wardrobe.

Are your memories like mine?

Carpet beater, entertainment centre, Warsaw 1970s
Games at carptet beater, somewehre in Poland 1970s
Games at carpet beater, somewhere in Poland 1970s

Well, it just feels natural now to illustrate this post with examples of toys, from around the same time. Sure, like every kid, or most of them, I also had a teddy bear, a rocking horse, and a doll that was bald from excessive brushing. Oh, here in Poland we had I believe the best cartoons that were ever produced and New Year’s Eve was the day when hours and hours of Walt Disney cartoons were played. That was all such a feast!

Having so little visual communication though, did it mean we were under-privileged? Not at all!

 

Reksio was on TV at 7 pm and lasted 10 minutes, we were glued to the screen

Bolek and Lolek, two brothers and their adventures

FAMOUS POLISH TEDDY BEARS

Originally the Colargol Bear is French but was well adopted here in Poland.

Colargol by Tadeusz Wilkosz, 1974
Teddy Drop Ear by Janusz Galewicz, 1975
Teddy Drop Ear by Janusz Galewicz, 1975
Popular bears in the 1970s

CARS TOYS

Toy inspiration – Polonez. It was a Polish car produced by FSO from 1978-2002

HOME SWEET HOME

Miniature furniture from the 1970s which very much resemble IKEA’s style. I had them too. If I only knew today it is a collector’s item.

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

50’s COMMUNISM AND THE COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

FSO Syrena Sport

Have you ever heard of ‘the potato beetle propaganda’ in the 1950’s?

So, here in Poland people were led to believe the nasty Americans dropped their potatoes beetles from their planes over East Germany and this invasion of the beetles, later on, spread to Poland too. These invaders had to be exterminated with Azotox, a very toxic detergent, which is more dangerous to the human body than the beetle itself (just an extra bit of protein on potatoes). Sounds a bit like the Irish Potatoes Famine, doesn’t it? Fortunately, here in Poland, it did not kill half of the population. The purpose of it was to distract the nation from the evil temptations of Western culture, the moral crisis and the wicked influence that it could have on the peaceful, idyllic Eastern Bloc. But, underneath the carpet, much more horrifying things were happening here, but secretly.

My mother at the time was a little girl and still remembers the aggressive insect attack, the smell of Azotox she had to spread on the American Colorado beetles that were creeping on the potatoes leaves. Apparently, older people have never seen those nasty insects before and without the extermination, there would be nothing left of the potatoes crop that year. I am left not knowing what to think. There is a bit of truth in every gossip, they say. Fake news and false flag operation is not a recent invention!

The 1950s in Eastern Europe was the period when Communism took a heavy toll on all. While listening to older people who lived through those difficult years I built certain images in my head. I am under the impression most of the time it was dark and very cold, people were frightened and very poor. After Stalin’s death in the 1953 very tight control of the information from the West loosened up. The New Style Look reached Poland in the mid-1950s followed by the desire for self-expression. Under the tragedy & comedy mask of Communism, interesting ideas started to appear in Polish design.

***

Beauty every day for everyone. Good patterns of mass production are economic value. Good patterns are also cultural value ~ Wanda Telakowska

***

At first, it was the engineers and constructors coming up with the new innovative design ideas. Later on, the industries started to employ young graduates from art schools. I have to admit, only recently through a Polish patriotic fashion brand ‘Red is Bad I found how cool some of those objects were. I believe I am one of many who is only now getting an education on creative Polish minds behind those designs. The new trend of Proud Poland has reached this land in recent years.

 


 

Cezary Nawrot – Polish industrial designer, a lecturer at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw and the creator of FSO Syrena Sport. Fans of motoring in Europe were delighted with this model. The body of the car was made of plastic, which was based on a self-supporting floor plate. Under the very low mask of the Syrena Sport, there was a prototype two-cylinder, four-stroke boxer engine developing the power of about 35 HP. The drive was moved to the front axle using a four-speed gearbox. The novelty was the hydraulic clutch drive and shift lever in the floor. Weighing about 700 kg, the coupe accelerated to a maximum speed of 110 km/h.

FSO Syrena Sport
FSO Syrena Sport

Although it was known from the very beginning that Syrena Sport is only a test platform of new solutions and technologies and that it will not enter the general production, it was not without pressure from the press and motoring enthusiasts to start even a short production series. The management of FSO was forced to end the work on Syrena Sport and to hide the only prototype.

The car, unfortunately, did not agree with the socialistic reality as an apparently it aroused the desire for the Western lifestyle. A dozen years later it was destroyed along with other projects to free the garage space. To this day, Syrena Sport is considered the most beautiful project of the Polish automotive industry. In 1962, the English showed the world the Triumph Spitfire model, which is reminiscent of Siren Sport. (source: bit.ly/2FNpKL9)

FSO Syrena Sport
FSO Syrena Sport

Instead of driving Syrena Sport, Polish roads were led by its ugly sister. Today, it is treated by cars lovers as a vintage automobile and often is used as a wedding car. Who would think! Whole fifty years later it got a new life! Through an appreciation of the present generation, it receives love, respect and dignity.

Syrena, Polish car designed in 1950s
Syrena, Polish car designed in the 1950s

POLISH DESIGN 1950’s

‘Furniture does not have to be attractive, formally expansive. Our life is rich enough not to complicate it with the forms of residential interiors’ ~ said Maria Chomentowska, an exceptional Polish furniture designer, creator of furniture icons for Polish design, the employee of the Institute of Industrial Design in the years 1951-1977. Chomentowska created about 200 design projects.

Char 'Spider' by Maria Chomentowska, 1956
Chair ‘Spider‘ by Maria Chomentowska, 1956
Chair 'Lungs' by Maria Chomentowska, 1956
Chair ‘Lungs’ by Maria Chomentowska, 1956

LUBOMIR TOMASZEWSKI

‘When I find twisted branches in a forest, I always have an impression that they talk about the battle with nature and life’s strength. My job is to add the rest of the story in the visual language~ Lubomir Tomaszewski, founder of Emotionalist Movement and remarkable Polish designer of the post-war period.

Designers such as Tomaszewski did not know the current work of foreign designers simply because they did not have access to it. They were aware of their ignorance of porcelain manufacturing technology and poor technical facilities in Polish factories. Knowing about these limitations, sculptors decided to experiment. Thanks to this, unique and original works could have been created. Everything was an experiment. Adventure with design began with small figures, individual forms were easier to enter into production than entire sets. In addition, the short series gave the opportunity to test the market and check the reaction to the product. Figures were to ensure financial liquidity, high sales were aimed at. (source: bit.ly/2CLo0kH)

 

 

Lubomir Tomaszewski, 'Camel', 1957
Lubomir Tomaszewski, ‘Camel’, 1957
Lubomir Tomaszewski, 'Roe deer', 1958
Lubomir Tomaszewski, ‘Roe deer’, 1958

 

‘PICASSY’ MIECZYSŁAW NARUSZEWICZ

Polish glass and ceramic designer, creator of original figurines that were remarkably expressive in their form and charming to their audience particularly his animal figurines, which offered an element of surrealism and surprise. Since 1958, Mieczyswław Naruszewicz together with Lubomir Tomaszewski were employed by Institute of Industrial Design. They worked on Ćmielów Figures sculptural ceramics created in Poland in between 1950-1960.

Mieczysław Naruszewicz, 'Panther', 1958
Mieczysław Naruszewicz, ‘Panther’, 1958
Mieczysław Naruszewicz, 'Żubr', 1957
Mieczysław Naruszewicz, ‘Żubr’, 1957
Mieczysław Naruszewicz, 'Turkey', 1956,
Mieczysław Naruszewicz, ‘Turkey’, 1956

All images are linked to the original sources.

Recommended pages to visit: desa.pl muzeumwarszawy.pl  culture.pl/en  meblostan.pl iwp.com.pl as.cmielow.com.pl

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

THE MARKER HOTEL, DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

ERODED NATURE THE INSPIRATION FOR THE MARKER HOTEL IN DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel was another educational pearl at The Open House Festival in 2014 in Dublin. The architect involved in the project gave a clear understanding of the inspiration for the design and its functionality. Once I was aware of the inspiration it became obvious what I was looking at. The building is inspired by cliffs at the coastline of the West of Ireland.

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin

The geometric glass elevation resembles the bottom part of the cliff. The part that gets washed and eroded by powerful Atlantic Ocean waves. The process creates a number of caves and gaps that are found deep in the rock, often used as a shelter for seals and birds. The use of the transparent shaded glass material at the front of the hotel mirrors the stormy ocean waters. The base part of the cliff is the location for the reception, lounge and the restaurant at the Marker Hotel. The toilets on the grand flour are just another little adventure. It is like walking into a dark cave where rocks are wet and a deaf echo joins the whistling wind. The wall sparkles in the dark just like minerals on the wet rock inside the cave.

The vibrant colours carried through the whole interior are taken from the mustardy yellow moss that grows on the rocks. The colour is repeated inside and outside of the hotel and is reflected in ornamental grasses at the front of the hotel too. The energetic lime and mustardy colours follow into the rooms.

Irish moss
Mustardy colour

The view from the rooftop bar of the Marker Hotel is overlooking the city, Dublin hills, the sea and it is a great spot to chill out. All in the close proximity of Airbnb headquarters and The Bord Gais Energy Theatre.

THE LOUNGE

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE RESTAURANT

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE CONFERENCE ROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE BEDROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE VIEW

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE ROOFTOP BAR

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska A. Walkowska

NUMBER 31

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

NR 31 GUEST HOUSE ON LEESON CLOSE

I saw the Nr 31 Guest House for The Open House Festival in 2014 with a friend of mine (Greville Edwards) who was very kind to share his photographs with me for this post. Unfortunately, I lost my version of the high-resolution photographs.

It has been some time since I saw it … four years ago. How do I remember it today? I remember it as a place I would like to stay in for the entire winter and read plenty of good books there. The kind of books I promised myself that one day I will read them. Books that require deep concentration. I imagine I would sit and read them around the fireplace on the leather sofa or inside of one of the warm rooms with the minimalistic interior design.

Guest House Nr 31 felt exclusive, yet simple and familiar. Apparently, Mick Jagger stayed there few times, so told the owner of the place during the tour he was giving. At the time there was no signage at the front door suggesting it is a guest house. People who need to know about it will find out through the word of mouth. The clientele is exclusive. At the back is a small secret garden, cleverly designed providing plenty of room for privacy to anyone who wants to visit it.

Nr 31 is a place you never want to leave but when you finally do, you will not have any regrets that life passed you by while you stayed there. The perfect retrieve house where the time does not exist. Inspiration will find you here. 

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin
Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin (fot. Greville Edwards)

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

All above images supplied by Greville Edwards – cool graphic designer.

Dublin mysterious Guest House

Dublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest House

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska