THE MARKER HOTEL, DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

ERODED NATURE THE INSPIRATION FOR THE MARKER HOTEL IN DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel was another educational pearl at The Open House Festival in 2014 in Dublin. The architect involved in the project gave a clear understanding of the inspiration for the design and its functionality. Once I was aware of the inspiration it became obvious what I was looking at. The building is inspired by cliffs at the coastline of the West of Ireland.

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin

The geometric glass elevation resembles the bottom part of the cliff. The part that gets washed and eroded by powerful Atlantic Ocean waves. The process creates a number of caves and gaps that are found deep in the rock, often used as a shelter for seals and birds. The use of the transparent shaded glass material at the front of the hotel mirrors the stormy ocean waters. The base part of the cliff is the location for the reception, lounge and the restaurant at the Marker Hotel. The toilets on the grand flour are just another little adventure. It is like walking into a dark cave where rocks are wet and a deaf echo joins the whistling wind. The wall sparkles in the dark just like minerals on the wet rock inside the cave.

The vibrant colours carried through the whole interior are taken from the mustardy yellow moss that grows on the rocks. The colour is repeated inside and outside of the hotel and is reflected in ornamental grasses at the front of the hotel too. The energetic lime and mustardy colours follow into the rooms.

Irish moss
Mustardy colour

The view from the rooftop bar of the Marker Hotel is overlooking the city, Dublin hills, the sea and it is a great spot to chill out. All in the close proximity of Airbnb headquarters and The Bord Gais Energy Theatre.

THE LOUNGE

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE RESTAURANT

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE CONFERENCE ROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE BEDROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE VIEW

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE ROOFTOP BAR

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska A. Walkowska

NUMBER 31

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

NR 31 GUEST HOUSE ON LEESON CLOSE

I saw the Nr 31 Guest House for The Open House Festival in 2014 with a friend of mine (Greville Edwards) who was very kind to share his photographs with me for this post. Unfortunately, I lost my version of the high-resolution photographs.

It has been some time since I saw it … four years ago. How do I remember it today? I remember it as a place I would like to stay in for the entire winter and read plenty of good books there. The kind of books I promised myself that one day I will read them. Books that require deep concentration. I imagine I would sit and read them around the fireplace on the leather sofa or inside of one of the warm rooms with the minimalistic interior design.

Guest House Nr 31 felt exclusive, yet simple and familiar. Apparently, Mick Jagger stayed there few times, so told the owner of the place during the tour he was giving. At the time there was no signage at the front door suggesting it is a guest house. People who need to know about it will find out through the word of mouth. The clientele is exclusive. At the back is a small secret garden, cleverly designed providing plenty of room for privacy to anyone who wants to visit it.

Nr 31 is a place you never want to leave but when you finally do, you will not have any regrets that life passed you by while you stayed there. The perfect retrieve house where the time does not exist. Inspiration will find you here. 

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin
Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin (fot. Greville Edwards)

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

All above images supplied by Greville Edwards – cool graphic designer.

Dublin mysterious Guest House

Dublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest House

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

THE OPEN HOUSE FESTIVAL 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

PRIVATE SPACES AT THE OPEN HOUSE FESTIVAL

It takes great courage of the owner of the house to open its door to the public. To strangers, really. Then let them walk through the most private parts of their personal space. It is an odd feeling to know so much, yet so little about the people, families who live in those houses. Seeing the books they read, the family photographs or cups they like their tea in. Imagining what it is like to sit in their well-used chairs in front of which they watch the mainstream news.  It is one of the reasons why it is the most interesting festival in Dublin … in my opinion. Wish a similar initiative was organised in most of the cities and towns. Anywhere and everywhere.

GARDEN

The house below is located somewhere in the South of Dublin. The architect who was working on the extension to the back garden was the one who guided the group. The biggest challenge faced was the unusual size of the frame for the back door going to the garden. It was hard to find a solution that would work. Luckily there were some Polish builders working on the project that came up with the ideal answer. The architect while telling the story and explaining the problem sighed with admiration and used the exact words: “The Polish people … are multiskilled!” How great it felt!

The charm happens in between the back garden and the large kitchen window.  During warm summer evenings the cosy, sheltered garden is brightened up with the kitchen light while the calming sound of cascading water runs down in the background of the slowly approaching night. During the daytime, the wall covered with ivy creates natural and fresh wallpaper for those looking out the kitchen window.

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, DublinThe Open House Festival 2016, DublinThe Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

KITCHEN & LIVING ROOM

It is not going to be very professional … unfortunately, I do not remember many details or challenges during the completion of this project. The focus is the extension of the house into the back garden and the parallel glass division running through the wall and the ceiling.

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

ANTIQUE STORE

If you planning to visit St. Patrick Cathedral (best to attend a service as it is free of charge and the choir is angelic) not far from it on Francis Street there are plenty antique shops, galleries and coffee shops. Another cool place to see in the area is The Marsh Library located just beside the St. Patrick Cathedral. You will travel in time in both of those places. Into the mysterious, dark, spiritual gothic period.

Antique store in Dublin
Antique store somewhere on Francis Street in Dublin

BEDROOM

This is one of the smallest houses I have seen so far during the festival. It is a cottage house with two floors and a terrace garden. Despite the fact it was tiny it felt spacious, airy and bright. The sun travels generously through the house pushing gently through each window. The owner and the designer is a young Irish architect who just moved in with his girlfriend into their newly renovated house.

Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016
Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016

Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

CHAPELIZOD ILLUSTRATIONS

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland

TOUR DE CHAPELIZOD

Chapelizod is one of many places described by James Joyce in his book Ulysses. After reading chosen fragments referring to the place I designed a series of images following the same creative style and technique. Each image carries a vibrant colour against the monochromatic background. I wanted to create an abstract, dream-like feel to the series.

I do not know much about the village other than it is a rather old place located just beside the Phoenix Park in Dublin. You get the feeling once it was a pleasant place to live in where all the neighbours knew each other. Today, it is a place with no personality, no life or character. Used only as a passing place to other destinations.

Picking up on that mood I have chosen the most significant landmarks. Places that once had something to offer. At present they seem outdated, forgotten and isolated.

LEMON GREEN

Ireland sober is Ireland stiff – James Joyce

Eircom phone box, once upon a time offered the use of modern technology and communication. At present covered in a spider web, contrasting with an old building wrapped in ivy.

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photograph traced in Illustrator

Phone box in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photo manipulation.

ORANGE

A nation is the same people living in the same place – James Joyce

Will this boat be ever used again? … Probably not. Because what would it be used for? Fishing? Recreation? The owner may have left the village and has forgotten all about it. You can sens the physical presence of a person. The no more existing owner of the boat.

Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland

Chapelizod river, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

TURQUOISE

No pen, no ink, no table, no room, no time, no quiet, no inclination – James Joyce

 

Not a living soul. The town is empty. Walls of those buildings are as fragile as an eggshell. Unrealistic birds flying through the town. On their way to a warmer more hopeful places.

Wake up now!

Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland

Main Street in Chapelizod, Dublin, Ireland
Photoshop, Illustrator and photograph manipulation

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

VICTORIAN FRONT GARDENS

Victorian front garden

VICTORIAN CLUES

To complete the journey on the Victorian architecture, here are some photographs that were taken in May 2018. Victorian gardens and houses in the Rathgar area.

In Ireland watering the gardens or the grass is totally unnecessary, in fact, I do not think I have ever have seen anyone doing so. Because of the humidity in the air everything around is full of life and greenery.

    

During the Industrial Revolution, there was a rapid development of the Dublin city, which at that time was under British rule. I am not a great fan of the city centre, but I do really like the neighbourhood in which I live. It has a lot of character. When walking around it I have an impression I travelled back in time to the British colonial period. Something Irish people would not see as intriguing or entertaining as I do, at all. I only want to admire the aesthetics of that period.

Solid front doors with ornaments made of brass. Sparkle cleaned every Saturday, by very well-educated housewives. Perfectly matched colours of the doors with the facade of the buildings or with the plants in the garden. Romanticism hidden in organic vault lines over the front doors. Refined British black gates, fences and barriers. Perfect set for a romance during an Art Nouveau period.

 

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Victorian front garden
Victorian front garden

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

THE GOLDEN RATIO AND THE RULE OF THIRDS IN NATURE

NATURE THE BEST ARTIST

Below images were taken in Dublin Botanic Garden in one of the Victorian greenhouses. The succulent plants made me think of the golden ratio, the mathematical formula that creates – everything!

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin Botanic Garden

THE RULE OF THIRDS

When I was studying design I was thought the number three is the ‘magic’ number. Use no more than three colours if you want to have well designed interior space  (only if you are very creative introduce the 4th colour in very small doses). Use the maximum of 3 typefaces if you are working with typography and keep the same rule when it comes to texture and shape. If you follow the rule your work will look good if not very good.

The Golden Spiral is also based on that magic number. Working space is dived into 1/3 and then the smaller part of it once again is divided into 1/3 and so on so on till eternity. When you join the meeting points with a curvy line it creates the spiral effect.

Our eye is ‘lazy’ does not like to make an effort when reading and sending the information to our brain. Anything that is is well balanced mathematically is also very well designed.

The pattern of the spiral can be used for creating a really well-composed photograph.

The Great Wave off Kanagawa, by Hokusai
The Great Wave off Kanagawa, by Hokusai

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin Botanic Garden

GOLDEN RATIO LIFE BALANCE

ADOBE COLOR WHEEL&SCHEMES

There is an interesting website called Adobe Color. After creating an account you can upload an image and it will pick the most dominating colours out of an image. You can save the selection of colours into your library and share it with other users. The result will show five colours which work very well together, try to choose three out of the five for your project or an idea for further development.

I uploaded a few images from the Dublin Botanic Garden to learn a little bit about colour’s combination designed by nature.

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Adobe Kuler

Dublin National Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

Dublin Botanic Garden
Dublin Botanic Garden

Adobe Kuler

 


 

This should be my last post this year or maybe this season on gardens and plants. I have few other things I would like to write about but first I want to finish the series on gardens, just to close it … for a while at least.

Dublin Botanic Garden
Happy turtle in the pond of Dublin Botanic Garden

Author: Walkowska Aleksandra

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