WRZEŚNIA ON AN OLD PHOTOGRAPHY

Ulica Sienkiewicza we Wrześni przed wojną

WRZEŚNIA MY WRZEŚNIA

I am born in and raised in Września but I have spent half of my life abroad. Returning to Poland after twenty years allowed me to look at my town from the perspective of … a visitor. Familiarity breeds contempt, they say. It is hard to appreciate what around us. Before I have left Poland I did not think much of the town I come from. Therefore, it is good and healthy to take a break from time to time to gain a different attitude.

Września has revived. Walking through the streets of the town in the evening, I am under an impression I have travelled back in time. The architecture of tenement houses in the old part of the town and the attention put into details creates a very special atmosphere. Bicycle parking and street lamps are kept in the Art Nouveau style, the period of the town greatest prosperity. Looking at the windows when the lights on, I can easily imagine the people living in them also come from the beginning of the century. The smallest details have been skillfully taken care of while refreshing the face of the town.

Września is located in Greater Poland, 50 km from Poznań, at an important road and rail point connecting Poznań with Warsaw. The location of the town has always been beneficial to the development of trade and crafts.

During the Second Partition of Poland, the town found itself in the East Prussia, therefore there is a strong influence of the Prussian presence in the town’s architecture. Those are very solid buildings with strong construction.

Every day at noon, the patriotic song Rota written by Maria Konopnicka is played through the town’s loudspeakers, in memory of the strike of the Września children in 1901. The children were the first to oppose speak in German during religion classes. The teacher punished them with a flog. Students of other schools in the Prussian partition followed in the footsteps of brave children from Września.

Three nations lived here at the beginning of the century; Germans, Jews and Poles who were the majority. It housed Roman Catholic churches, an Evangelical church, and a synagogue that was blown up by the Germans.

After the war, during the communist era, Września continued to develop, both economically and culturally. The loudspeaker factory was established here, in the 1980s every Polish music lover wanted to have one of them. Today, the main economic driver is the factory of Volkswagen AG, which employs 3,000 people. And once again Września is strongly influenced by its western neighbours.

The history of Września is much deeper, but in this series, I want to tell how much it has changed and transformed over time. From the pre-war period to the present day. The face of the town changes the same way as the face of a person depending on the conditions and the time it lives in …

WRZEŚNIA ON AN OLD PHOTOGRAPHY

The source of photography are the following books:
Ziemia i Powiat Wrzesiński na starej pocztówce, Jolanta Śliwczyńska, Waldemar Śliwczyński, Wydawnictwo Kropka, Września 2003

Przedwojenna Września Fotografie Franciszka Włosika, Wydawnictwo Kropka, Września 2005

Poznańska Street - view from St. Stanisław in Września, 1914
Poznańska Street – view from St. Stanisław in Września, 1914
Sąd przy ulicy Poznańskiej
Court at Poznańska Street
Ratusz miejski we Wrześni
Town Hall in Września
The Parish Church on Poznańska Street in 1038-1939
The Parish Church on Poznańska Street in 1038-1939
The market square in Września before the war
The market square in Września before the war
The exit of Poznańska Street to the Market Square in Września
The exit of Poznańska Street to the Market Square in Września
Września Poznańska Street
Września Poznańska Street
Mickiewicza Street in Września with a view of the Parish Church
Mickiewicza Street in Września with a view of the Parish Church
Września delicatessen shop before the war on the corner of Sienkiewicza Street and Rynek
Września delicatessen shop before the war on the corner of Sienkiewicza Street and Rynek
Tobolski's restaurant Kościelna Street in Września, 1915
Tobolski’s restaurant Kościelna Street in Września, 1915
Taxi and horse cabs at Zamkowa Street in Września
Taxi and horse cabs at Zamkowa Street in Września
Zamkowa Street in Września, 1909
Zamkowa Street in Września, 1909
Września ul. Dzieci Wrzesińskich in the early 1950s.
Września ul. Dzieci Wrzesińskich in the early 1950s.
Willa Mycielski on Kościuszki Street
Willa Mycielski on Kościuszki Street
The synagogue on Fabryczna Street in Września
The synagogue on Fabryczna Street in Września was built in 1875. During World War II, the synagogue was closed and turned into a temporary prison. The Nazis planned to convert the synagogue into a cinema and theatre, but eventually, they blew up the building in the fall of 1940. An air-raid shelter was built on the site of the synagogue and a square was arranged.
German plans to convert a synagogue into a cinema and theatre
Water supply tower
Water supply tower put into operation around 1910 Photo. W. Schenke, 1917

Autor: Aleksandra Walkowska

 

POLISH DESIGN / 1930’s

Shoe workshop Kielman, Warsaw, Interwar period.

Hello, to all of you who follow my blog. At first, I would like to apologise for not posting for such a long time. My Mac has decided to say goodbye … or it’s hard-drive made the decision. I have tried to replace it with an SSD card but it behaved like a patient who did not recognise the heart transplant. The images I had prepared for my future posts are not available now, consequently, I had to change the flow of topic, from the interior design and architectural festival in Dublin to Polish design and its history. Hope you find it enjoyable!

GRANDPARENTS HOUSE OF THE 1930s STYLE

I am very sentimental when it comes to the interior design of my grandparent’s house, especially the living room. Their house was built and decorated in the late 1930s before the war in a style I deeply admire and respect. The elegant cut in fashion, refined strong lines in furniture design and in the architecture. My grandparent’s cottage in Greater Poland was built firm and compact, therefore, generation after generation will live in it comfortably. Every room had a ceramic oven that would warm up the place till the early morning, this technology must have been brought here by the Germans who were always very present in the West of Poland. In the living room, there was a wooden round table forever decorated with a hand made linen table cloth that was embroidered by my grandmother. Special plates and glasses were kept in a solid dark timber cabinet. Loud tick-tock coming from the clock on the wall, was a great reminder of the time passing by. Every so often the clock had to be manually set by the alfa male of the house, my grandfather. It was an important and responsible job, setting up the time machine. Time had a slightly different value back then. The reproduction of ‘The last supper’ by Leonarda da Vinci covered the wall were all family gatherings took place every Sunday.

Every item had its place, there was no room for unnecessary poor quality pieces. Well, back then most of the pieces of furniture were made by hand and once made they did not have to be replaced until the next generation grew up and took the lead. Funny how I find it enchanting when my mother calls it an old junk! Apparently, sixty years have to pass by before something becomes a collector’s piece. At first, it has to go through the journey of being kitsch then junk and so on until well-aged grandchildren will discover it again and call it classic. Those are my memories, unfortunately, I do not have any images to share … well, the war was not the time to take photographs.

Grandparents house in Greater Poland.
Grandparents house in Greater Poland.

POLISH DESIGN 1930s

I went through the few websites and found some well-constructed design pieces from the 1930s. Poland back then when was still a free country.
Chair 1930. XX w. Poland.
Chair 1930. XX w. Poland.
Serwis do kawy 'Płaski' lata 30. XX w proj. Bogdan Wendorf
Coffee service ‘Płaski’ 1930. XX w proj. Bogdan Wendorf
Ring. Interwar period. Poland.
Ring. Interwar period. Poland.
A bottle of beer from the Haberbusch and Schiele brewery.
A bottle of beer from the Haberbusch and Schiele brewery.
Sugar-bowl 'Kula' 1935. Proj. Julia Keilowa.
Sugar-bowl ‘Kula’ 1935. Proj. Julia Keilowa.
Shoe workshop Kielman, Warsaw, Interwar period.
Shoe workshop Kielman, Warsaw, Interwar period.
Polish steam train
Steam train Pm36-1 Beautiful Helen PKP, 1936. Speed 140k/h. Warsaw-Kraków, Warsaw-Łódz routes. Up till 1942 used by the German occupants, rumours say later on used in the Soviet Union.

Polish steam train 1936

All images are linked to the original source.

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

THE MARKER HOTEL, DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

ERODED NATURE THE INSPIRATION FOR THE MARKER HOTEL IN DUBLIN

The Marker Hotel was another educational pearl at The Open House Festival in 2014 in Dublin. The architect involved in the project gave a clear understanding of the inspiration for the design and its functionality. Once I was aware of the inspiration it became obvious what I was looking at. The building is inspired by cliffs at the coastline of the West of Ireland.

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin

The geometric glass elevation resembles the bottom part of the cliff. The part that gets washed and eroded by powerful Atlantic Ocean waves. The process creates a number of caves and gaps that are found deep in the rock, often used as a shelter for seals and birds. The use of the transparent shaded glass material at the front of the hotel mirrors the stormy ocean waters. The base part of the cliff is the location for the reception, lounge and the restaurant at the Marker Hotel. The toilets on the grand flour are just another little adventure. It is like walking into a dark cave where rocks are wet and a deaf echo joins the whistling wind. The wall sparkles in the dark just like minerals on the wet rock inside the cave.

The vibrant colours carried through the whole interior are taken from the mustardy yellow moss that grows on the rocks. The colour is repeated inside and outside of the hotel and is reflected in ornamental grasses at the front of the hotel too. The energetic lime and mustardy colours follow into the rooms.

Irish moss
Mustardy colour

The view from the rooftop bar of the Marker Hotel is overlooking the city, Dublin hills, the sea and it is a great spot to chill out. All in the close proximity of Airbnb headquarters and The Bord Gais Energy Theatre.

THE LOUNGE

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE RESTAURANT

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE CONFERENCE ROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE BEDROOM

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE VIEW

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

THE ROOFTOP BAR

The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014
The Marker Hotel, Dublin, The Open House Festival 2014

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska A. Walkowska

NUMBER 31

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

NR 31 GUEST HOUSE ON LEESON CLOSE

I saw the Nr 31 Guest House for The Open House Festival in 2014 with a friend of mine (Greville Edwards) who was very kind to share his photographs with me for this post. Unfortunately, I lost my version of the high-resolution photographs.

It has been some time since I saw it … four years ago. How do I remember it today? I remember it as a place I would like to stay in for the entire winter and read plenty of good books there. The kind of books I promised myself that one day I will read them. Books that require deep concentration. I imagine I would sit and read them around the fireplace on the leather sofa or inside of one of the warm rooms with the minimalistic interior design.

Guest House Nr 31 felt exclusive, yet simple and familiar. Apparently, Mick Jagger stayed there few times, so told the owner of the place during the tour he was giving. At the time there was no signage at the front door suggesting it is a guest house. People who need to know about it will find out through the word of mouth. The clientele is exclusive. At the back is a small secret garden, cleverly designed providing plenty of room for privacy to anyone who wants to visit it.

Nr 31 is a place you never want to leave but when you finally do, you will not have any regrets that life passed you by while you stayed there. The perfect retrieve house where the time does not exist. Inspiration will find you here. 

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin
Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin (fot. Greville Edwards)

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

Nr 31 Guest House in Dublin

All above images supplied by Greville Edwards – cool graphic designer.

Dublin mysterious Guest House

Dublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest HouseDublin mysterious Guest House

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

THE OPEN HOUSE FESTIVAL 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

PRIVATE SPACES AT THE OPEN HOUSE FESTIVAL

It takes great courage of the owner of the house to open its door to the public. To strangers, really. Then let them walk through the most private parts of their personal space. It is an odd feeling to know so much, yet so little about the people, families who live in those houses. Seeing the books they read, the family photographs or cups they like their tea in. Imagining what it is like to sit in their well-used chairs in front of which they watch the mainstream news.  It is one of the reasons why it is the most interesting festival in Dublin … in my opinion. Wish a similar initiative was organised in most of the cities and towns. Anywhere and everywhere.

GARDEN

The house below is located somewhere in the South of Dublin. The architect who was working on the extension to the back garden was the one who guided the group. The biggest challenge faced was the unusual size of the frame for the back door going to the garden. It was hard to find a solution that would work. Luckily there were some Polish builders working on the project that came up with the ideal answer. The architect while telling the story and explaining the problem sighed with admiration and used the exact words: “The Polish people … are multiskilled!” How great it felt!

The charm happens in between the back garden and the large kitchen window.  During warm summer evenings the cosy, sheltered garden is brightened up with the kitchen light while the calming sound of cascading water runs down in the background of the slowly approaching night. During the daytime, the wall covered with ivy creates natural and fresh wallpaper for those looking out the kitchen window.

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, DublinThe Open House Festival 2016, DublinThe Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

KITCHEN & LIVING ROOM

It is not going to be very professional … unfortunately, I do not remember many details or challenges during the completion of this project. The focus is the extension of the house into the back garden and the parallel glass division running through the wall and the ceiling.

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin
The Open House Festival 2016, Dublin

ANTIQUE STORE

If you planning to visit St. Patrick Cathedral (best to attend a service as it is free of charge and the choir is angelic) not far from it on Francis Street there are plenty antique shops, galleries and coffee shops. Another cool place to see in the area is The Marsh Library located just beside the St. Patrick Cathedral. You will travel in time in both of those places. Into the mysterious, dark, spiritual gothic period.

Antique store in Dublin
Antique store somewhere on Francis Street in Dublin

BEDROOM

This is one of the smallest houses I have seen so far during the festival. It is a cottage house with two floors and a terrace garden. Despite the fact it was tiny it felt spacious, airy and bright. The sun travels generously through the house pushing gently through each window. The owner and the designer is a young Irish architect who just moved in with his girlfriend into their newly renovated house.

Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016
Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016

Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016Bedroom, The Open House Festival 2016

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska

YELP HEADQUARTERS DUBLIN

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

WHAT IS YELP?

In a few words, it is a website that publishes reviews of local businesses. It also trains small businesses on how to respond to reviews and how to hosts social events.

Yelp headquarters office was part of The Open House Festival in Dublin in 2016. The office is located not far from St. Stephen Green Park and it is just beside the Iveagh Gardens at Hatch Street.

The interior of Yelp headquarters is a splash of primary colours. The positive, welcoming yellow at the entry in combination with black is followed by a geometrically shaped desk and wavy hall. Contrasting colours and shapes. As we go along more colours are introduced. The playroom is inspired by the 1970ties style. The colours are muted, relaxed, natural. The working space area and the canteen are brightened up with red. In the same colour are chairs, the counter and other decorative elements. No need for a coffee among those vivid colours!

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014
Yelp Headquarters in Dublin, Ireland – Open House Festival 2014

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

YELP ENTERTAINMENT ROOM

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014
Yelp Headquarters in Dublin, Ireland – Open House Festival 2014

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

OFFICES

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014
Yelp Headquarters in Dublin, Ireland – Open House Festival 2014

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

MEETING ROOM

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014
Yelp Headquarters in Dublin, Ireland – Open House Festival 2014

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

CANTEEN

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014
Yelp Headquarters in Dublin, Ireland – Open House Festival 2014

Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014Yelp Headquarter in Dublin, Ireland - Open House Festival 2014

Written by: Aleksandra Walkowska

A. Walkowska